Privately sponsored refugees

Refugee Sponsorship Gala

After sponsoring a family of 4 from Colombia, the Grantham Mennonite Brethren Church is a gala to raise money for the sponsorship of another family. 

The resettlement process is in partnership with the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC), and the Blended Visa Office Referred Program (BVOR) which matches refugees identified for resettlement by the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) with private sponsors in Canada. 

You can help them by either attending the gala or contacting the church to make a donation. 

PSR: How to Support Settlement and Integration

It can take some time before grasping your responsibilities as a private sponsor towards the refugees that you are sponsoring. 

To help you get there, the Refugee Sponsorship Training Program 9RSTP) is organizing a webinar. 

Attendees will be able to get:

  • A recap of the sponsors’ settlement and financial responsibilities under the PSR program

  • A review of the FAQs on post-arrival financial support

PSR: Getting Ready for Month 13

Month 13 is a turning point in the private sponsorship experience. 

After all, it marks the end of the financial commitment that sponsors had toward the refugees they sponsored. 

However, before getting there, it is important to prepare the refugees for what lays ahead. 

The Refugee Sponsorship Training Program (RSTP) is organizing a webinar to help you prepare. 

The following topics will be covered: 

How Canada's Refugee System Works

On the 4th of June 1969, Canada signed the 1951 Convention  pertaining to the status of refugees, 18 years after it was adopted by the United Nations. Since then, Canada has forged quite a reputation as being a leader in refugee resettlement. Unlike economic immigrants, refugees did not make a conscious choice to leave their country to seek a better life elsewhere. They fled their country because they are at risk of, or have experienced persecution.

Different Streams to be a Private Sponsor

The 1976 Immigration Act, which came into effect in 1978, was the first immigration act that clearly defined the fundamental objectives of Canadian immigration policy. It defined refugees as a distinct class of immigrants and required a mandatory responsibility on the government to plan for the future of immigration. The private sponsorship was quickly used in 1979 to sponsor Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Laotian refugees.