Sponsored refugees

Workshop: Preparing the Arrival of Refugees

Now that you have received the Notice of Arrival Transmission (NAT), it is time to prepare for the arrival of the refugee you sponsored. 

To make sure that you have everything set to welcome them, the Office for Refugees Archdiocese of Toronto is organizing a workshop. 

During this workshop, sponsors will be able to get the last preparatory information necessary to be ready for arrival and pick up at the airport.

Date: Tuesday, 18th of February, 2020

Refugee Sponsorship Gala

After sponsoring a family of 4 from Colombia, the Grantham Mennonite Brethren Church is a gala to raise money for the sponsorship of another family. 

The resettlement process is in partnership with the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC), and the Blended Visa Office Referred Program (BVOR) which matches refugees identified for resettlement by the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) with private sponsors in Canada. 

You can help them by either attending the gala or contacting the church to make a donation. 

PSR: How to Support Settlement and Integration

It can take some time before grasping your responsibilities as a private sponsor towards the refugees that you are sponsoring. 

To help you get there, the Refugee Sponsorship Training Program 9RSTP) is organizing a webinar. 

Attendees will be able to get:

  • A recap of the sponsors’ settlement and financial responsibilities under the PSR program

  • A review of the FAQs on post-arrival financial support

PSR: Getting Ready for Month 13

Month 13 is a turning point in the private sponsorship experience. 

After all, it marks the end of the financial commitment that sponsors had toward the refugees they sponsored. 

However, before getting there, it is important to prepare the refugees for what lays ahead. 

The Refugee Sponsorship Training Program (RSTP) is organizing a webinar to help you prepare. 

The following topics will be covered: 

Canadian Business Etiquette

Settling in a foreign country entails familiarizing yourself with its language and its code of conduct, especially when you intend to work in that country.  Getting to know the Canadian business etiquette can help you transition smoothly in the job market without any bumps or misunderstanding. The last thing you want is to rub your coworkers the wrong way by unknowingly doing something that they may consider offensive. 

How refugees are screened before coming to Canada

Coming to Canada as a refugee is far from being an easy process. The procedure is long and tedious. Refugees go through various steps which consist of several layers of approval and screening; with the displaced person’s file being reviewed by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Interpol, Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and similar databases in allied countries. 

How Canada's Refugee System Works

On the 4th of June 1969, Canada signed the 1951 Convention  pertaining to the status of refugees, 18 years after it was adopted by the United Nations. Since then, Canada has forged quite a reputation as being a leader in refugee resettlement. Unlike economic immigrants, refugees did not make a conscious choice to leave their country to seek a better life elsewhere. They fled their country because they are at risk of, or have experienced persecution.